BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Exchange mix CDs with each other.
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whodathunkit
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby whodathunkit » 29 Oct 2008, 10:27

A bonus disc with his October mix from dgs.

"Increasing Isolation" is a sequence of 12 instrumentals. You could call them atmospheric, impressionistic, minimalist or even musique concrete but I guess ambient would be the most widely-accepted genre description. Whatever, not many toe-tappers here.

It's widely accepted that the first "ambient" music was composed by Erik Satie, a set of three pieces he called "Furniture Music"to be be played by a small group of musicians at an art exhibition in Paris early 1900s. If any visitors stopped to listen, Satie would move them along sharpish. It was for absorbing not listening to. So, in best Satiesque manner, I haven't actually sat down and "listened" to this mix. It's just be on repeat while I read the paper, argued with the missus, cut my toenails, nipped out to the shop, took several naps,etc. And it works. Can't explain why, it's just been nice having it around.

A breakdown of individual tracks would sorely test my descriptive powers but you can probably work it out for yourself. Stark clusters of piano notes, natural sound effects, murmering electronica and a lot of wind-chimey stuff. And a long (12 minute) track at the end that sounds like an endlessly repeating backwards foghorn that gives me the willys.

Thanks Dave. I do like this sort of thing but I never actually get round to acquiring any so it's nice to have it. Your listing should be interesting.
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby dgs » 31 Oct 2008, 09:00

whodathunkit wrote:A bonus disc with his October mix from dgs.

"Increasing Isolation" is a sequence of 12 instrumentals. You could call them atmospheric, impressionistic, minimalist or even musique concrete but I guess ambient would be the most widely-accepted genre description. Whatever, not many toe-tappers here.

It's widely accepted that the first "ambient" music was composed by Erik Satie, a set of three pieces he called "Furniture Music"to be be played by a small group of musicians at an art exhibition in Paris early 1900s. If any visitors stopped to listen, Satie would move them along sharpish. It was for absorbing not listening to. So, in best Satiesque manner, I haven't actually sat down and "listened" to this mix. It's just be on repeat while I read the paper, argued with the missus, cut my toenails, nipped out to the shop, took several naps,etc. And it works. Can't explain why, it's just been nice having it around.

A breakdown of individual tracks would sorely test my descriptive powers but you can probably work it out for yourself. Stark clusters of piano notes, natural sound effects, murmering electronica and a lot of wind-chimey stuff. And a long (12 minute) track at the end that sounds like an endlessly repeating backwards foghorn that gives me the willys.

Thanks Dave. I do like this sort of thing but I never actually get round to acquiring any so it's nice to have it. Your listing should be interesting.


This started out as a response to Oscar's decreasing desolation disc and in principle was meant to be a book end to it, reversing the concept and flowing from short to long. It morphed with the passage of time into an exploration into minimalism and isolation which was supposed to take the listener on a journey. Whilst it is a collection of 12 tracks it is, I suppose, conceptually one long track. I am not sure that it is actually there yet and may require some tinkering with the earlier tracks.

The last track is very interesting being the work of William Basinski and taken from his disintegration loops recording. This track had to be the end track as what you listen to is actually the death of the original music, a long story best read on his website but as the transfer was being made from the tape to digital the tape started to decay and dissolve during the process resulting in irreparable loss.

Glad that you foiund some interest in it.

Tracklisting

Silent Sound (Spiritualized) 1:03
4 Good reasons to leave all this behind (Ben Frost) 2:32
Mountain Cabin (Scanner) 3:33
Floating/Sinking (Peter Broderick) 4:04
Morning (Alva Noto + Ryuchi Sakamoto) 5:22
Freeze (Labradford mix) ((LFO) 6:28
Sparks (Marcus Guenter) 7:05
Out of nothing a new hope was born (Peter Kuhlmann) 8:00
Pachelbel (I) Fullnes of the Wind (Brian Eno) 9:53
Piano Aquieu (Stars of the Lid) 10:53
Cello Recycling (Aaron Martin & Machinefabreik) 11:37
dlp 1.3 (William Basinski) 12:00
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby whodathunkit » 13 Nov 2008, 13:22

bhoywonder wrote:Bonus disc
1
is this the divine comedy? it’s horrible in the same way that they are. Sorry. Not for me.

2
Is this Dolly? It sounds like it probably is, but I don’t know this one. I like it. I like Dolly. Or whoever this is. It takes me somewhere that most stuff I listen to doesn’t take me.

3
Not really my bag, again. It’s that sort of traditional folk influence that led to things like all about eve and new model army. I don’t really like that much traditional folk music from the british isles, in all honesty. It often sounds too worthy for me, which is the case here.

4
Nice music, I don’t like the singing. This seems to be a theme of our tastes: we like different singing styles.

5
Stuff like this just kind of passes me by really. I think the appeal of it must lie in something that I don’t find appealing, I guess. It’s not that I hate it, I just don’t really get it. Maybe it’s a lyrics thing, I don’t know.

6
This is cool. Is it Doris Duke? Possibly Candi Staton? I’m awful at placing names to voices. It’s cool though. Sounds like it might have been on one of those Country Got Soul collections. I like this.

7
Lovely. You know, in a not very happy kind of way! Really good song, really well performed. I love this.

8
More of those OTT arrangements. To see beyond these arrangements to whether the song hidden underneath is any good is like adding coca cola to red wine and then trying to work out what the wine was like.

9
The problem with modern wars is that people don’t sing good folk songs about them like this any more. And this is the opposite of the previous track in that this sounds so good that it almost doesn’t matter whether the song itself is up to much. It sounds good.

10
Passed me by really.

11
Pleasant enough, if a little ‘something of nothing’ to these ears.

12
No thanks. To twee. It’s that traditional folk thing again.

13
Cracking opening line! Is this Richard Thompson? I can’t help but rather like him, and this, despite disliking lots of things about it. The world is a better place to have people like him in it.

14
Oh lord, no, not for me. Is this the carpenters? Sounds like them. Horrid. My mum would like it.

15
This is rather nice, for something this folky. Good song. I should know this voice. It sounds a bit like Heidi Berry but I’ve not listened to her since the late 80s, so I wouldn’t know it if it was. Really pretty.

16
In the nicest possible way, what the fuck is this?!?


"16 Tears" - a mix of 16 of the most miserable songs I know. Love lost, love never won, love regained and then lost again. Dead children, dead parents, dead siblings and dead friends. (I avoided the deceased pets angle in a rare outbreak of good taste). By it's nature, a set like this is only ever going to have a modest hit rate so I was glad that more than one or two got through.

This was the line-up.

1. "Our Mutual Friend" - Divine Comedy
2. "Down From Dover" - Dolly Parton
3. "The Parish Notices" - Jez Lowe & the Bad Pennies
4. "Wind And Rain" - Crooked Still
5. "Angel From Montgomery" - John Prine
6. "If She's Your Wife (Who Am I)? " - Doris Duke
7. "Randall Knife" - Guy Clark
8. "In The Winter" - Dusty Springfield
9. "Take The News To Mother" - Louvin Brothers
10. "Red Dirt Girl" - Emmylou Harris
11. "Keep Me In Your Heart" - Warren Zevon
12. "I Live Not Where I Love" - Tim Hart & Maddy Prior
13. "The End Of The Rainbow" - Richard Thompson
14. "I Can't Make You Love Me" - Bonnie Raitt
15. "The Cloud Factory" - June Tabor
16. "The Last Will And Testament Of Jake Thackray" - Jake Thackray.
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby bhoywonder » 13 Nov 2008, 13:54

Thanks, dude. I really should listen to more Guy Clark. And I should play my Doris Duke more often.

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Magilla » 14 Dec 2008, 21:27

I received a bonus disc in November called Full Circle Songs. It was from Clarkophile, so, as expected, there's a lot of Byrds-related stuff on it.

Full Circle Songs:

1) A cover of 'Eight Miles High'. Apart from Husker Du's legendary cover, I'm unfamiliar with any other covers of said Byrds' classic, but this is really good. It's energetic and intense. Good start.

2) I suspect this is a Gene Clark cover, but I can't place the actual song. Whoever's singign this has a great voice, though.

3) A nice chugging guitar line in this song. It's a good, solid, thrashy number.

4) This is a pretty neat alt-country song. The male-female harmony vocals work a treat.

5) This is fantastic. It's a fairly intricate, orchestrated song. The vocals are technically limited, but utterly genuine and convincing. This song has true depth.

6) This appears to be Emmylou Harris dueting with someone. The arrangement is very sparse. However, it strikes me as the sort of thing Emmylou can do in her sleep - it's solid, but no classic.

7) A good pop song with effervescent guitar bursts here and there.

8) The opening riff is very similiar to The Triffids' 'Convent Walls'. This is a good pop song, very US '80s indie, in that early-REM era style.

9) A nice pop song, but didn't blow me away.
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Clarkophile » 28 Dec 2008, 01:16

No Xmas For John Key wrote:I received a bonus disc in November called Full Circle Songs. It was from Clarkophile, so, as expected, there's a lot of Byrds-related stuff on it.

Full Circle Songs:
As I indicated in my PM, my iTunes crashed and I lost the song list, but I'm going to do my level best to recreate it from your descriptions and my own dwindling memory.
These are all covers of songs in which Gene Clark was the principal songwriter
.


1) A cover of 'Eight Miles High'. Apart from Husker Du's legendary cover, I'm unfamiliar with any other covers of said Byrds' classic, but this is really good. It's energetic and intense. Good start.

This is indeed an energetic cover of 'Eight Miles High, by Not Lame power pop artists, Myracle Brah---actually, artist, being Andy Bopp, who plays pretty much everything on this, I think.' From the Full Circle: A Tribute to Gene Clark disc.


2) I suspect this is a Gene Clark cover, but I can't place the actual song. Whoever's singign this has a great voice, though.

3) A nice chugging guitar line in this song. It's a good, solid, thrashy number.

4) This is a pretty neat alt-country song. The male-female harmony vocals work a treat.

5) This is fantastic. It's a fairly intricate, orchestrated song. The vocals are technically limited, but utterly genuine and convincing. This song has true depth.
A hh, this one I remember. This is actor David Hemmings, warbling through Gene Clark's exquisitely complex chamber pop workout, 'Back Street Mirror.' The backing track was actually recorded for and with Clark, but when Gene passed over the song, his vocals were simply wiped, and Hemmings' er, uh, "singing", was added.


6) This appears to be Emmylou Harris dueting with someone. The arrangement is very sparse. However, it strikes me as the sort of thing Emmylou can do in her sleep - it's solid, but no classic.
Not Emmylou, but Allison Krauss, with erstwhile Zep front man Robert Plant, doing a rather lovely version of Dillard & Clark's title track to their 2nd album.


7) A good pop song with effervescent guitar bursts here and there.

8) The opening riff is very similiar to The Triffids' 'Convent Walls'. This is a good pop song, very US '80s indie, in that early-REM era style.

9) A nice pop song, but didn't blow me away.


That's all I can remember, I'm afraid, in terms of matching up with your comments.
Other songs included, but which I'm unable to attach to your reviews, are:
'Long Time' -- The Retros
'Won't Let You Down' - George Usher
'That's Alright By Me' -- Michael Carpenter
'So You Say You Lost Your Baby - Paul Weller
'Elevator Operator' - Suburban 9 to 5
'Why Not Your Baby' - Sid Griffin

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby John_K » 21 Jan 2009, 11:36

2009 01 - The Other Side of My Head [Bonus Disc]

Cheers Steve, first time outing in Mix Club and a bonus disc to boot!

01 Opens with Zappa's Peaches en Regalia. For years I avoided Zappa, almost afraid of what I'd be presented with, until finally I bought a copy of Hot Rats. Opening with this, it was such a joy, and nothing close to what I was expecting to hear.

02 Eno's St. Elmo's Fire. For too long in my mind Eno has been either twiddling knobs for Roxy Music or U2, and although I've got a number of his solo recordings I don't pay them enough attention. maybe 2009 is the year to remedy that...

03 Burial's Archangel from one of my favourite albums from 2007. In fact I've used this track on a mix myself :)

04 The mighty Will Oldham aka Bonnie 'Prince' Billy with I See a Darkness.

05 Radiohead's Pyramid Song

06 Interesting electronic that I don't recognise with rat-a-tat beats and a simple melodic line.

07 I'm guessing this is Mike Oldfield, but it's been a while since I heard anything by him. It does however remind me.

08 Another favourite group of mine, Sonic Youth with Expressway to yr Skull.

09 This one is driving me nuts, I've heard it so many times recently and it's just not coming back to me - love it! I think I've remembered!! It's Demon Fuzz with the opening track from Afreeka??? I've used this on a mix too, it's fabulous :D

10 Some chillout electronica that I don't recognise. Not a genre I play a lot, but it can be quite lovely at the right moment.

11 A moody electronic piece, again I don't recognise. I need to brush up on my electronica ;-)

12 Another I don't recognise, minimal lyric and a very sparse guitar over a programmed backing? Repetitve in a trancy way...

13 Quite a familiar vocal? Is it Mark Hollis / Talk Talk?? I've picked up a couple of theirs last year, but obviously haven't given them enough attention yet...

14 Some haunting atmospherics to wind things up, again new to me.

Enjoyed this one, at times it felt as though it had been tailor made for me, looking forward to finding out who the mystery tracks are by.

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby 010101010101 » 21 Jan 2009, 17:50

Glad you liked it, John. If there's anything on here you'd like more of, feel free to give me a shout

The Other Side of My Head - January BCB Mix Club Bonus

Frank Zappa - Peaches en Regalia
Brian Eno - St Elmo's Fire
Burial - Archangel
Bonnie "Prince" Billy - I See A Darkness
Radiohead - Pyramid Song
Aphex Twin - 4
Popol Vuh - Gemeinschaft
Sonic Youth - Expressway to yr Skull
Demon Fuzz - Past, Present and Future
Boards of Canada - Peacock Tail
Mogwai - Scotland's Shame
The Durutti Column - Otis
Talk Talk - I Believe In You
Brian Eno - An Ending (Ascent)

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby John_K » 21 Jan 2009, 20:17

Should have been a PM :oops:

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby beenieman » 10 Feb 2009, 06:52

My January bonus disc:


1. Dub. Very languid. I don’t listen much to dub. All very moody. No idea who this.
2. Bob. I don’t listen to him much anymore but he does transcend reggae doesn’t he. Still the biggest selling reggae artist every year. His Earthday last week, 6 February.
3. Interesting start. Loch Ness Monster in the house. Deejaying from the 70’s. This is Lee Perry type stuff. I’ve never been a fan of Perry, if it’s him. He’s one of music’s great charlatans after his early days of greatness, but this is an amusing tune. Not really my thing though.
4. Early stuff. Rocksteady. A nice vocal. “I am King”? I’ll know who this is when you reveal I’m not sure . Nice stuff and early reality tune. Nice horn in the middle too. Sadly there are no longer any great musicians coming thru. It’s all digital and computers now.
5. Instrumental rather than dub. Sounds like a TV theme tune doesn’t it?
6. Still old stuff. More rocksteady. Nice enuff but not up to Track 4 which is a good find.
7. Another early, ska, instrumental. Again not really my thing but nice for what it is.
8. This seems to pick it up a bit. Another lovely vocal - reggae from the seventies I’d say. Again someone I should know. So many great singers from such a small island. Great lyrics too.
9. This is more your space cadet dub. Dub’s not really my thing sorry.
10. Summertime in the Ghetto. A bit too dubby for me. Laurel Aitken? Not for me.
11. Now this I know. More 70’s deejaying. Dillinger? The whole U Roy/Dillinger/I Roy etc era is not my favourite. All sounds quite aimless to me. This was of course in the early early days of dee jaying and the novelty factor hasn’t helped the songs endure for me.
12. UK reggae . Not quite reggae is it? A British Jamaican. There is lots of greast British reggae out there. I like the track but its more like folk music isn’t it?
13. The second tune I recognize after Bob. This is of course Peter Tosh with African. I’ve always preferred Tosh to Marley and I think they are both very accessible to non reggae listeners. Tosh was much more consistently militant though. Great stuff.
14. Dub.
15. This perks me up. Culture. Lion Rock.
16. Speed metal. Just kidding. This is fast. A fast style track to close.

This is the first reggae disc I’ve received in mix club and thanks for it. Much of it is not my thing but I’ll be interested in the reveal of Tracks 4 & 8. Generally too old school for me though.
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby whodathunkit » 10 Feb 2009, 13:10

beenieman wrote:My January bonus disc:


1. Dub. Very languid. I don’t listen much to dub. All very moody. No idea who this.
Little Axe and Go Away Devil from "Champagne and Grits". Not the best of Skip McDonald's soundscape albums but I wanted a moody opener.
2. Bob. I don’t listen to him much anymore but he does transcend reggae doesn’t he. Still the biggest selling reggae artist every year. His Earthday last week, 6 February.
Very interesting Beenie. I shall light a candle. This however is Black Uhuru and Utterance from their fantastic "Red" album :D Yes. I'm smirking.
3. Interesting start. Loch Ness Monster in the house. Deejaying from the 70’s. This is Lee Perry type stuff. I’ve never been a fan of Perry, if it’s him. He’s one of music’s great charlatans after his early days of greatness, but this is an amusing tune. Not really my thing though.
Loch Ness Monster by King Horror which I suppose could be a Lee Perry pseudonym. It's certainly bonkers enough.
4. Early stuff. Rocksteady. A nice vocal. “I am King”? I’ll know who this is when you reveal I’m not sure . Nice stuff and early reality tune. Nice horn in the middle too. Sadly there are no longer any great musicians coming thru. It’s all digital and computers now.
An old mod favourite - Jimmy Cliff and King Of Kings.
5. Instrumental rather than dub. Sounds like a TV theme tune doesn’t it?
Dreadzone and the Black Star Liner Mix of their "hit", Little Britain
6. Still old stuff. More rocksteady. Nice enuff but not up to Track 4 which is a good find.
Old stuff = Good stuff. The Maytals and Schooldays.The bass playing is quite extraordinary.
7. Another early, ska, instrumental. Again not really my thing but nice for what it is.
Every once in a while some idiot tries to fuse Folk with Reggae - it never works (see Afro-Celtic Sound System, Edward II, etc). This is the exception wot proves the rule. The Pogues dub version of Young Ned Of The Hill.
8. This seems to pick it up a bit. Another lovely vocal - reggae from the seventies I’d say. Again someone I should know. So many great singers from such a small island. Great lyrics too.
Life by Bob Andy. The very definition of a Reggae classic.
9. This is more your space cadet dub. Dub’s not really my thing sorry.
To be honest, it's not mine either except in small doses.And there's just a nice little pop song buried underneath all this.Stars by Dubstar
10. Summertime in the Ghetto. A bit too dubby for me. Laurel Aitken? Not for me.
Correct
11. Now this I know. More 70’s deejaying. Dillinger? The whole U Roy/Dillinger/I Roy etc era is not my favourite. All sounds quite aimless to me. This was of course in the early early days of dee jaying and the novelty factor hasn’t helped the songs endure for me.
Croaking Lizard by Prince Jazzbo.I think drugs may be involved here :shock: .
12. UK reggae . Not quite reggae is it? A British Jamaican. There is lots of greast British reggae out there. I like the track but its more like folk music isn’t it?
Bit of a left-field pick - I can hear the influence but it's a long way back.Days Of Fire by Nitin Sawnhey from "London Undersound"
13. The second tune I recognize after Bob. This is of course Peter Tosh with African. I’ve always preferred Tosh to Marley and I think they are both very accessible to non reggae listeners. Tosh was much more consistently militant though. Great stuff.
Yep
14. Dub.
Dutch outfit,Rude Rich and the Highnotes and Melodies Of War - sort of Dub meets Lounge
15. This perks me up. Culture. Lion Rock.
Can't beat a bit of Culture. Peel session version
16. Speed metal. Just kidding. This is fast. A fast style track to close.
A little revenge for your introducing me to the horrors of Snagglepuss :D . Us punk outfit Melt Banana putting the boot into Monkey Man

This is the first reggae disc I’ve received in mix club and thanks for it. Much of it is not my thing but I’ll be interested in the reveal of Tracks 4 & 8. Generally too old school for me though.


Cheers Peter.It struck me that sending you a reggae-related mix was about the dumbest thing any member of mix club could do. So I did it. Here's the listing

1. "Go Away Devil" - Little Axe
2. "Utterance" - Black Uhuru
3. "Loch Ness Monster" - King Horror
4. King Of Kings" - Jimmy Cliff
5. "Little Britain (Black Star Liner Mix)" - Dreadzone
6 "Schooldays" - The Maytals
7. "Young Ned Of The Hill (Dub Version)" - The Pogues
8. "Life" - Bob Andy
9. "Stars (Mother Dub)" - Dubstar
10. "Summertime In The Ghetto" - Laurel Aitken and the Skatallites
11. "Croaking Lizard" - Prince Jazzbo
12. "Days Of Fire" - Nitin Sawnhey (featuring Natty)
13. "African" - Peter Tosh
14. "Melodies Of War" - Rude Rich and the Highnotes
15. "Lion Rock" - Culture
16. "Monkey Man" - Melt Banana
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby beenieman » 10 Feb 2009, 19:04

whodathunkit wrote:
beenieman wrote:My January bonus disc:


1. Dub. Very languid. I don’t listen much to dub. All very moody. No idea who this.
Little Axe and Go Away Devil from "Champagne and Grits". Not the best of Skip McDonald's soundscape albums but I wanted a moody opener.
2. Bob. I don’t listen to him much anymore but he does transcend reggae doesn’t he. Still the biggest selling reggae artist every year. His Earthday last week, 6 February.
Very interesting Beenie. I shall light a candle. This however is Black Uhuru and Utterance from their fantastic "Red" album :D Yes. I'm smirking.
3. Interesting start. Loch Ness Monster in the house. Deejaying from the 70’s. This is Lee Perry type stuff. I’ve never been a fan of Perry, if it’s him. He’s one of music’s great charlatans after his early days of greatness, but this is an amusing tune. Not really my thing though.
Loch Ness Monster by King Horror which I suppose could be a Lee Perry pseudonym. It's certainly bonkers enough.
4. Early stuff. Rocksteady. A nice vocal. “I am King”? I’ll know who this is when you reveal I’m not sure . Nice stuff and early reality tune. Nice horn in the middle too. Sadly there are no longer any great musicians coming thru. It’s all digital and computers now.
An old mod favourite - Jimmy Cliff and King Of Kings.
5. Instrumental rather than dub. Sounds like a TV theme tune doesn’t it?
Dreadzone and the Black Star Liner Mix of their "hit", Little Britain
6. Still old stuff. More rocksteady. Nice enuff but not up to Track 4 which is a good find.
Old stuff = Good stuff. The Maytals and Schooldays.The bass playing is quite extraordinary.
7. Another early, ska, instrumental. Again not really my thing but nice for what it is.
Every once in a while some idiot tries to fuse Folk with Reggae - it never works (see Afro-Celtic Sound System, Edward II, etc). This is the exception wot proves the rule. The Pogues dub version of Young Ned Of The Hill.
8. This seems to pick it up a bit. Another lovely vocal - reggae from the seventies I’d say. Again someone I should know. So many great singers from such a small island. Great lyrics too.
Life by Bob Andy. The very definition of a Reggae classic.
9. This is more your space cadet dub. Dub’s not really my thing sorry.
To be honest, it's not mine either except in small doses.And there's just a nice little pop song buried underneath all this.Stars by Dubstar
10. Summertime in the Ghetto. A bit too dubby for me. Laurel Aitken? Not for me.
Correct
11. Now this I know. More 70’s deejaying. Dillinger? The whole U Roy/Dillinger/I Roy etc era is not my favourite. All sounds quite aimless to me. This was of course in the early early days of dee jaying and the novelty factor hasn’t helped the songs endure for me.
Croaking Lizard by Prince Jazzbo.I think drugs may be involved here :shock: .
12. UK reggae . Not quite reggae is it? A British Jamaican. There is lots of greast British reggae out there. I like the track but its more like folk music isn’t it?
Bit of a left-field pick - I can hear the influence but it's a long way back.Days Of Fire by Nitin Sawnhey from "London Undersound"
13. The second tune I recognize after Bob. This is of course Peter Tosh with African. I’ve always preferred Tosh to Marley and I think they are both very accessible to non reggae listeners. Tosh was much more consistently militant though. Great stuff.
Yep
14. Dub.
Dutch outfit,Rude Rich and the Highnotes and Melodies Of War - sort of Dub meets Lounge
15. This perks me up. Culture. Lion Rock.
Can't beat a bit of Culture. Peel session version
16. Speed metal. Just kidding. This is fast. A fast style track to close.
A little revenge for your introducing me to the horrors of Snagglepuss :D . Us punk outfit Melt Banana putting the boot into Monkey Man

This is the first reggae disc I’ve received in mix club and thanks for it. Much of it is not my thing but I’ll be interested in the reveal of Tracks 4 & 8. Generally too old school for me though.


Cheers Peter.It struck me that sending you a reggae-related mix was about the dumbest thing any member of mix club could do. So I did it. Here's the listing

1. "Go Away Devil" - Little Axe
2. "Utterance" - Black Uhuru
3. "Loch Ness Monster" - King Horror
4. King Of Kings" - Jimmy Cliff
5. "Little Britain (Black Star Liner Mix)" - Dreadzone
6 "Schooldays" - The Maytals
7. "Young Ned Of The Hill (Dub Version)" - The Pogues
8. "Life" - Bob Andy
9. "Stars (Mother Dub)" - Dubstar
10. "Summertime In The Ghetto" - Laurel Aitken and the Skatallites
11. "Croaking Lizard" - Prince Jazzbo
12. "Days Of Fire" - Nitin Sawnhey (featuring Natty)
13. "African" - Peter Tosh
14. "Melodies Of War" - Rude Rich and the Highnotes
15. "Lion Rock" - Culture
16. "Monkey Man" - Melt Banana


I'm gonna listen to track 2 as soon as I get home. Mykal Roze of Black Uhuru has a very distinctive voice too :oops:

I was probably a bit harsh in my review. I did appreciate the thought and there was a decent strike rate of good stuff.

I'd forgotten I'd given you Snaggle Puss :D I must do a 'cartoon character' reggae mix some time soon :D
One night, an evil spirit held me down
I could not make one single sound
Jah told me, 'Son, use the word'
And now I'm as free as a bird

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby whodathunkit » 02 Mar 2009, 17:18

Velvis wrote
There was a themed bonus disc as well. A nice collections of songs about bands. I was familiar with a lot of it, all of it good.


Here's the listing for "Backstage Pass", Eric.

1. "Please Sing A Song For Us" - The Humblebums
2. "Thunderbuck Ram" - Mott The Hoople
3. "The Story of a Rock''Roll Band" - Randy Newman
4. "Young Electric, Psychedelic Band" - Barry Mann
5. "I Got A Gig" - Hayes Carl
6. "The Bride Stripped Bare " - Bonzo Dog Band
7. "Rollers Show" - Nick Lowe
8. "Guitar Man" - Jerry Reed
9. "Fan Club" - The Damned
10. "Rhythm Guitar" - Emmylou Harris
11. "Mate Of The Bloke" - Half Man Half Biscuit
12. "Vivian Prince" - Pretty Things
13. "Watford Gap" - Roy Harper
14. "Shine So Bright" - Teddy Thompson
15. "Thirty Year Man" - Pete Atkin
16. "We're The Replacements" - They Might Be Giants
Image

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Magilla » 06 Mar 2009, 21:18

I got an excellent bonus disc from Oscar called Bespoke, in February. There are 16 songs on it ranging from the ok to awesome, which was the case with most songs here. There was a whole heap of cool tracks by many of my favourite artists, plus interesting tracks by acts I didn't recognise.

The cover graphic is impressive, too.

Bespoke:

1) This is a short, very jangly pop song. The instrumentation is very Stone Roses, but it's not Ian Brown singing, so it must be someone else. The lyrics use the word "velocity" at one point, so it may be Primal Scream's 'Velocity Girl'. I'm not a fan of Stone Roses or Primal Scream, but this is tolerable compared to their normal rubbish.

2) Big Star - 'For You' from Third / Sister Lovers, of course. Wonderful song from a great album.

3) Tim Buckley - 'Morning Glory' from Goodbye And Hello. A very interesting song - it's a singer-songwriter type song broadly speaking, but much, much stronger than anything on his debut. But it's also hinting at, as the album does overall, at the experimental stuff that would follow.
Trivia: this was the song that Fairport Convnetion played when they auditoned Sandy Denny.

4) John Cale - 'Hanky Panky Nohow', from Paris 1919. Fuck John Cale is talented. Lovely stuff.

5) Johnny Cash, 'Cry, Cry, Cry'. Right from the start you can just tell this is Johnny Cash. The chicken scratch guitar chugs along; he does it so well. The lyrics are pretty simple "moon / June" stuff, but still convincing.

6) Frantic strumming and urgent rhythms. The singer's not all that good technically, but he's totally engaging. Now and again there's a few bursts of weird effects in the mix, as at about 2.20 or so. A really good pop song.

7) Keyboards whir and drone, while a violin makes a deeply mournful sound. A sax occasionally blasts and a drum beats solemnly. This is fantastic and I could listen to an album of this very happily.

8) Bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom...'It's A Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl'. I love Faust's '70s stuff, it really is fantastic. Bloody fantastic. :)

9) Some vibes and a Moog dominate here. A piercing guitar line sneaks in now and again. The drums are pulsating and frantic, but not loud - if they were, it'd ruin the feel of this piece. I'm impressed, this is wonderful.

10) This is definitely Eno, as I recognise the voice, but I've no idea which of his songs this is. I've got his '70s stuff, but I don't think it's from any of those. Bloody good song, either way.

11) Kraftwerk, 'Ruckzuck' from Kraftwerk. Seven minutes of weirdness from a bunch of German oddballs. This must've sounded out-right bizarre upon release and still cuts it effortlessly these days.

12) Sax and sparse piano give a very contemplative feel here. It's a jazz track and quite likely one I own, but I'm dreadful at identifying jazz tracks. Very enjoyable stuff anyway.

13) Chiming percussion and cascading piano. This is delightful; again, I could go an album of this easily.

14) Nina Simone - I'm a big fan, but I don't think I've got this track. It's one of her tirades against racism, not one of her ballads or love songs. She's got a beautiful voice and there's nice, under-stated, but impressive instrumentation, including a guitar solo, something of a rarity in her music.

15) A catchy, reggae-ish instrumental with loads of vibes and percussion. This is good stuff.

16) Walker Brothers, 'My Ship Is Coming In'. A soaring, strident, huge piece of pop. An excellent way to end the comp.

Thanks heaps, Oscar!! Loads of superb songs and some very intrigueing unknown pieces.
"U2 routinely spent a year in the studio...I have a theory: if you put four monkeys in the studio for a year with Lanois and Eno and Lillywhite, they would make a pretty good record, too."

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Oscar » 07 Mar 2009, 09:04

I very hastily scoured the boards and assembled tracks based on your expressed likes and favourites (sure Primal Scream was on one of them).

Bespoke:

1)This is a short, very jangly pop song. The instrumentation is very Stone Roses, but it's not Ian Brown singing, so it must be someone else. The lyrics use the word "velocity" at one point, so it may be Primal Scream's 'Velocity Girl'. I'm not a fan of Stone Roses or Primal Scream, but this is tolerable compared to their normal rubbish.
It is indeed the 1minute 20second Velocity Girl. The twee-est indie pop song I’ve ever heard.

2) Big Star - 'For You' from Third / Sister Lovers, of course. Wonderful song from a great album.
True

3) Tim Buckley - 'Morning Glory' from Goodbye And Hello. A very interesting song - it's a singer-songwriter type song broadly speaking, but much, much stronger than anything on his debut. But it's also hinting at, as the album does overall, at the experimental stuff that would follow.
Trivia: this was the song that Fairport Convnetion played when they auditoned Sandy Denny.
Yup!

4) John Cale - 'Hanky Panky Nohow', from Paris 1919. Fuck John Cale is talented. Lovely stuff.
Never liked the man. Nice song though.

5) Johnny Cash, 'Cry, Cry, Cry'. Right from the start you can just tell this is Johnny Cash. The chicken scratch guitar chugs along; he does it so well. The lyrics are pretty simple "moon / June" stuff, but still convincing.
Very typical Cash

6) Frantic strumming and urgent rhythms. The singer's not all that good technically, but he's totally engaging. Now and again there's a few bursts of weird effects in the mix, as at about 2.20 or so. A really good pop song.
The Clock by The Go-Betweens. Thought you’d get this one. One of my faves too.

7) Keyboards whir and drone, while a violin makes a deeply mournful sound. A sax occasionally blasts and a drum beats solemnly. This is fantastic and I could listen to an album of this very happily.
“The Proposition #1” from the OST of ‘The Proposition’ by Nick Cave & Warren Ellis. I didn’t want to put anything too obvious by Cave on the comp.

8) Bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom...'It's A Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl'. I love Faust's '70s stuff, it really is fantastic. Bloody fantastic.
I enjoyed this too and it’s the first time I’d listened to it.

9) Some vibes and a Moog dominate here. A piercing guitar line sneaks in now and again. The drums are pulsating and frantic, but not loud - if they were, it'd ruin the feel of this piece. I'm impressed, this is wonderful.
Weeping Wall by David Bowie from Low. I put it in this section of the comp to represent the Krautrock quarter of the mix.

10) This is definitely Eno, as I recognise the voice, but I've no idea which of his songs this is. I've got his '70s stuff, but I don't think it's from any of those. Bloody good song, either way.
Broken Head by Eno, Moebius & Roedelius from After the Heat

11) Kraftwerk, 'Ruckzuck' from Kraftwerk. Seven minutes of weirdness from a bunch of German oddballs. This must've sounded out-right bizarre upon release and still cuts it effortlessly these days.
Correct!

12) Sax and sparse piano give a very contemplative feel here. It's a jazz track and quite likely one I own, but I'm dreadful at identifying jazz tracks. Very enjoyable stuff anyway.
Naima by John Coltrane.

13) Chiming percussion and cascading piano. This is delightful; again, I could go an album of this easily.
Lullaby For Helene by Bill Evans. This track was new to me so I’ll have to investigate further too.

14) Nina Simone - I'm a big fan, but I don't think I've got this track. It's one of her tirades against racism, not one of her ballads or love songs. She's got a beautiful voice and there's nice, under-stated, but impressive instrumentation, including a guitar solo, something of a rarity in her music.
Listen again. It’s actually Syl Johnson (a bloke)

15) A catchy, reggae-ish instrumental with loads of vibes and percussion. This is good stuff.
More Creation by Lennie Hibbert. He’s the bloke playing the Xylophone.

16) Walker Brothers, 'My Ship Is Coming In'. A soaring, strident, huge piece of pop. An excellent way to end the comp.
It’s a great song isn’t it.

1 velocity_girl 01:22 primal scream
2 For You 02:44 Big Star
3 Morning Glory 02:52 Tim Buckley
4 Hanky Panky Nohow 02:47 John Cale
5 Cry! Cry! Cry! 02:28 Johnny Cash
6 The Clock 04:08 The Go-Betweens
7 The Proposition #1 03:25 Nick Cave & Warren Ellis
8 It's A Rainy Day, Sunshine Girl 07:25 Faust
9 Weeping Wall 03:29 David Bowie
10 Broken Head 05:27 Eno, Moebius & Roedelius
11 Ruckzuck 07:49 Kraftwerk
12 Naima 04:25 John Coltrane
13 Lullaby For Helene 02:56 Bill Evans
14 Is It Because I'm Black? 07:39 Syl Johnson
15 More Creation 04:18 Lennie Hibbert
16 My Ship Is Coming In 02:59 The Walker Brothers

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Magilla » 20 Apr 2009, 10:18

Beenieman very kindly included a bonus reggae bonanza to go with the main March mix disc I got from him.
As with the main disc there's a whole heap of intriguing stuff on it, much of which I've really enjoyed. I suspect there's also a fair few songs by acts I've only ever heard of before and not actually heard until now.
Also, as a reggae novice, I'm finding it hard to describe it very well, so please excuse my descriptions being a bit inarticulate.

Anyway, here we go...

1) The singer's got a lisp and dedicates the track to the 9/11 victims. The syncopated electronica backing is quite unusual in a reggae setting. This song is ok, but nothing beyond that.

2) The strident vocals are a good feature, as is the catchy guitar line. Generally not bad.

3) This song epitomises what I really like about reggae - the er, high chance of some utterly peculiar arrangement or production touch. In this case, it's the fantastic vocals - which rattle along about three times faster than the actual music. Such stuff is so simple but effective. The weird synth blurts are a cool touch, too.

4) The croaky vocals are neat, very direct and righteous. This is a good song (see, not very articulate). :oops:

5) Absolutely brilliant. It's a fairly uptempo song, with a forceful melody. The vocals are pretty good, but what makes this song really good are the stunning backing vocals. I like the superb, basic guitar riff as well.

6) Again, great vocals over a typically bouncy riff. I like this track.

7) Not a bad song, but the synth drums put me off liking it more.

8) A totally excellent, excellent, excellent song. The melody is brilliant and the vocals are very convincing and impressive. I really like the singer here. If he's not regarded as one of reggae's great singers, then I'd like to know why not.

9) This song also catches what I like about reggae; often the singer is clearly nutty as a fruit cake. The singer's going mental, babbling away about this, that and the next thing. Plus, as a bonus, he has the ability to endlessly echo his own vocals. The words reverberate for ages - he'll sing a line, then draw out the final word for ages. It's pretty intense, but a neat song.

10) Big, booming bass, even by reggae standards and fast vocals - good track.

11) The percussion in this is very appealing. The verse singers are quite good, but the main / chorus singer veers too close to rap, which just doesn't work in this context, so that hampers the song from being better.

12) A chunk of heavy toasting (I think). The vocals are good, but the drum machine and synths are a bad touch.

13) Some more neat toasting. The backing vocals on this are lovely. Good song.

14) Far too smooth, too "reggae-lite" , dangerously near UB40 territory.

15) As with the above, somewhat bland.

16) Too smooth as well. A bit too much modern "r 'n'b" in places as well.

17) This is heaps better. The harmony singing is wonderful and I really like the staunch rhythms and the clipped guitar line. The lyrics, about smoking the ganja are hilarious: "pass me the Rizla, I have a quarter pound of sizzler" :lol:

18) Fantastic, very catchy stuff. I'm really impressed with the drumming, loads of neat fills through-out the song. This was a cool song to finish on.

Thankos heaps, Peter. I'm still trying to get my head around reggae and both discs you've sent have been great intros to this fascinating, very intriguing genre. Sorry I didn't like 14 - 16, but otherwise this is a neat comp. I especially liked 3, 5, 8, 9, and 13.
"U2 routinely spent a year in the studio...I have a theory: if you put four monkeys in the studio for a year with Lanois and Eno and Lillywhite, they would make a pretty good record, too."

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby beenieman » 21 Apr 2009, 07:40

Magilla wrote:Beenieman very kindly included a bonus reggae bonanza to go with the main March mix disc I got from him.
As with the main disc there's a whole heap of intriguing stuff on it, much of which I've really enjoyed. I suspect there's also a fair few songs by acts I've only ever heard of before and not actually heard until now.
Also, as a reggae novice, I'm finding it hard to describe it very well, so please excuse my descriptions being a bit inarticulate.

Anyway, here we go...

1) The singer's got a lisp and dedicates the track to the 9/11 victims. The syncopated electronica backing is quite unusual in a reggae setting. This song is ok, but nothing beyond that.

2) The strident vocals are a good feature, as is the catchy guitar line. Generally not bad.

3) This song epitomises what I really like about reggae - the er, high chance of some utterly peculiar arrangement or production touch. In this case, it's the fantastic vocals - which rattle along about three times faster than the actual music. Such stuff is so simple but effective. The weird synth blurts are a cool touch, too.

4) The croaky vocals are neat, very direct and righteous. This is a good song (see, not very articulate). :oops:

5) Absolutely brilliant. It's a fairly uptempo song, with a forceful melody. The vocals are pretty good, but what makes this song really good are the stunning backing vocals. I like the superb, basic guitar riff as well.

6) Again, great vocals over a typically bouncy riff. I like this track.

7) Not a bad song, but the synth drums put me off liking it more.

8) A totally excellent, excellent, excellent song. The melody is brilliant and the vocals are very convincing and impressive. I really like the singer here. If he's not regarded as one of reggae's great singers, then I'd like to know why not.

9) This song also catches what I like about reggae; often the singer is clearly nutty as a fruit cake. The singer's going mental, babbling away about this, that and the next thing. Plus, as a bonus, he has the ability to endlessly echo his own vocals. The words reverberate for ages - he'll sing a line, then draw out the final word for ages. It's pretty intense, but a neat song.

10) Big, booming bass, even by reggae standards and fast vocals - good track.

11) The percussion in this is very appealing. The verse singers are quite good, but the main / chorus singer veers too close to rap, which just doesn't work in this context, so that hampers the song from being better.

12) A chunk of heavy toasting (I think). The vocals are good, but the drum machine and synths are a bad touch.

13) Some more neat toasting. The backing vocals on this are lovely. Good song.

14) Far too smooth, too "reggae-lite" , dangerously near UB40 territory.

15) As with the above, somewhat bland.

16) Too smooth as well. A bit too much modern "r 'n'b" in places as well.

17) This is heaps better. The harmony singing is wonderful and I really like the staunch rhythms and the clipped guitar line. The lyrics, about smoking the ganja are hilarious: "pass me the Rizla, I have a quarter pound of sizzler" :lol:

18) Fantastic, very catchy stuff. I'm really impressed with the drumming, loads of neat fills through-out the song. This was a cool song to finish on.

Thankos heaps, Peter. I'm still trying to get my head around reggae and both discs you've sent have been great intros to this fascinating, very intriguing genre. Sorry I didn't like 14 - 16, but otherwise this is a neat comp. I especially liked 3, 5, 8, 9, and 13.


I'll do the reveal on my return. I can't remember what I put on very well from this distance :D

Glad you enjoyed it and I hope the stuff I gave you in Dunedin goes down well too.

Cheers.
One night, an evil spirit held me down
I could not make one single sound
Jah told me, 'Son, use the word'
And now I'm as free as a bird

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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby beenieman » 26 Apr 2009, 05:17

Magilla wrote: Beenieman very kindly included a bonus reggae bonanza to go with the main March mix disc I got from him.
As with the main disc there's a whole heap of intriguing stuff on it, much of which I've really enjoyed. I suspect there's also a fair few songs by acts I've only ever heard of before and not actually heard until now.
Also, as a reggae novice, I'm finding it hard to describe it very well, so please excuse my descriptions being a bit inarticulate.

Anyway, here we go...


No need to think your reviews of reggae are inarticulate. Your review made me anxious to see what the tracks I’d put on the disc were.

Magilla wrote: 1) The singer's got a lisp and dedicates the track to the 9/11 victims. The syncopated electronica backing is quite unusual in a reggae setting. This song is ok, but nothing beyond that.


Elephant Man The Bombing The intro referencing 9/11 was inserted later but the song itself was released within a week of 9/11 and was a chart topper for Elephant Man. The lyrics which foresaw restrictions on international travel and war in the Middle east were more telling than any of the more considered responses released over later years.

Here’s the lyrics:

Intro:
Yeah, I got to say I send my condolences to all the family, who lose
Someone in the tragic attack on America
For two thousand and one the eleventh of September the ninth
I gotta say we give thanks to all of you comin out
Showin love, everybody uniting together, united we stand divided we fall
You know, to all the fireman who lose dem life
I wrote something in my song, so log on to the next track comin
Elephant Man this one is for you...........
BRING IT!!!!! We right here, Elephant ain't goin anywhere
Shankle my nankle Bin Ladin get trampled, alright cool!!!

Chorus:
Everybody fraid fi fly to di bombing
Bush nah trust nuh guy to di bombing
So many innocent die to di bombing
Look like a world war three out fi happen
Nuh weed caan smuggle again to di bombing
Caan past custom wid a pen to di bombing
Everybody cry for end to di bombing, dead body start adding



Verse 1:
Well a since dat did happen
First man dem suspect pon di list a Bin Ladin
This attack pon America, cannot be forgotten
Glad seh mi neva deh a New York a shoppin
Sorry fi di firefighter dem weh dead inna Manhattan
Write it in arabic english and latin
Anybody weh bruk di peace bone ago rotten
Nah trust wophead cooley inna silk nah satin
Dem woulda try sometin, Capeach!!!!

Chorus:
Everybody fraid fi fly to di bombing
Bush nah trust nuh guy to di bombing
Visa a get denied to di bombing
Look like a world war three out fi happen
Nuh weed caan smuggle again to di bombing
Caan past custom wid a pen to di bombing
People a cry for end to di bombing, Look like a world war...

Verse 2:
Di situation upsettin, now mi can see it clear everybody frettin
Look like a world war three dem mekin
Di eleventh a di night di twin tower get wreckoned
Plane popped dung di city, but we still jammin
Dung a Jamaica a fun we still havin
All a we dancehall dem keep on rammin
Gal a do hair, fingernail, and shoppin
Some a log it on, zip it up, collar poppin
Who dis Blacka? Kiprich still a map him
War still a bruk still unda him coffin
Music live on champagne still poppin and gal a get woppin, Capeach!!!

Chorus:
Everybody fraid fi fly to di bombing
Bush nah trust nuh guy to di bombing
Visa a get denied to di bombing
Look like a world war three out fi happen
Nuh weed caan smuggle again to di bombing
Caan past custom wid a pen to di bombing
Everybody cry for end to di bombing, look like a world war three...

Repeat Verse 1 and chorus till end

Magilla wrote: 2) The strident vocals are a good feature, as is the catchy guitar line. Generally not bad.


Another big hit - Chuck Fender Gash Them & Light Them. Another big hit. This was banned because of it’s violent lyrics. All about cutting up criminals and setting them on fire. Hmmm… that is a little violent isn’t it?

On the other hand is the claim that the song is a spiritual song for the Rastafarian community. A song that has positive words and "gash dem" and "light them" speak to a spiritual cleansing.

Here’s the lyrics for you to judge:

intro;
ooh oh LORD
a di living fiyah once more enuh
they really don't know
cyaah cool enuh cyaah watah dung enuh
naah compromise nuh time enuh

verse:1
a big man like you
rape off a 6 yr old baby
a big man like you
pop off yuh gun and put nine pon a likkle ole lady
a big man like you
bunn dung a school and a talk bout yuh mad sick and crazy
but when GOD hol yuh
nuh if nor nuh but nuh badda tell almighty bout maybe

chorus:
gash dem and light dem
for all the negative vibes weh dem a bring
gash dem and light dem
mi come fi mash up and wreck up dem senseless killing
gash dem and light dem
bwoie affi reverse wid dem bag a gun ting
gash dem and light dem
stand guard and come out a di wages of sin

verse:2
yuh love yuh life si dung and pawk it
and stop carry watah inna baaskit
suh mi affi draw fi all di MOSES law
eye fi a eye a dat nuff a onuh waah
onuh a push it till blood stawt draw
all di wrongs bwoie yuh have to pay fah

chorus:
gash dem and light dem
for all the negative vibes weh dem a bring
gash dem and light dem
mi come fi mash up and wreck up dem senseless killing
gash dem and light dem
bwoie affi reverse wid dem bag a gun ting
gash dem and light dem
stand guard and come out a di wages of sin

verse:3
dunce bat yuh nuh si seh yuh nuh smawt
come a tell mi seh yuh don't have nuh hawt
a long time wi a preach and a talk
and a tell yuh gi di politics a walk
but yuh a tell mi yuh nuh fraid fi pop it off
caah yuh love hear di big dog a bawk


Don’t fret. I won’t paste the lyrics to all the songs!

Magilla wrote: 3) This song epitomises what I really like about reggae - the er, high chance of some utterly peculiar arrangement or production touch. In this case, it's the fantastic vocals - which rattle along about three times faster than the actual music. Such stuff is so simple but effective. The weird synth blurts are a cool touch, too.


Perfect All I’ve Got The tune just rolls along doesn’t it? Perfect is an up and coming singer and has had a number of great tracks in last couple of years.

Magilla wrote: 4) The croaky vocals are neat, very direct and righteous. This is a good song (see, not very articulate). :oops:


Capleton Jah Jah City. This song is all about Kingston and the ever rising levels of violence in the city. “Jah Jah City Bloody City”. It borrows lyrically from Denis Brown’s Bloody city of some 25 years prior. Capelton has been around for some years now.

OK – here’s the lyrics:

Jah Jah city Jah Jah town
dem waan fi turn it in a cow bwoy town now....

And I seh Ini promote to di highest level
(you better know)
So lets burn dis evil concept
cah we ah seh dis is a destruction to di humanity
so we ah seh
(you better know)
Wanna watch out now
oy
check dis Jah!

[Chorus:]
Jah Jah city, Jah Jah town
dem waan fi turn it in'a cow bwoy town now
unno look yah now
Jah Jah city, Jah Jah town
dem waan fi turn in'a dead man town now
unno look yah now

[Verse 1]
Well Mr. John Crow draw coffin John Brown
we nuh waan no more dead ina town
Mr. Happy got so lucky trigger happy yow
we no waan no more dead body
well Mr. Joe kill quick, we nuh waan no more hit
we nuh waan no more grave an we waan no more casket
well life we promote which is righteousness
Sadam get a lick!
Unno look yah now!

[Repeat Chorus]

[Verse 2]
Dem ah tell me how dem cold
Big forty five
fi shoot down dem brother mold
nuff ah dem seh dem cold like a body north pole
so dem shoot down di young, shoot down di old
shoot down di puss an di dog an di fool
Every weekend dem tek a next payroll
out of man pocket dem shoot out billfold
Dis Marcus Garvey nuff a head haffi go roll
look yah now

[Repeat Chorus]

[Verse 3]
Dem think dem reach di ultimate, yow
but dem reach nowhere yet, oy
dem get caught in in a internet
and society a tell dem dem a intellect
dem promote too much dead
Unno look yah now

[Repeat Chorus]

Ten miles outta di city oy
it ah go get too shitty
warn Mr. John and me go warn Ms. Mitty
warn all di shottah an me go warn all die hitty
nuff a dem seh kill man without pity
Wrong kind of sip me all ah ketch dem ah sippy
True dem licky licky, dem sicky
Rastafari judgement will slew all, yo!

[Repeat Chorus]

Ayyyy...

Send me go trod down ina di east
tell dem fi hold di peace
we nuh waan no more coffin, we nuh waan no more hit
Well life we ah promote fi mek de ghetto youth see't
Life is wha we wish
Unno watch out now

[Repeat Chorus]

Bloody, Bloody....


Magilla wrote: 5) Absolutely brilliant. It's a fairly uptempo song, with a forceful melody. The vocals are pretty good, but what makes this song really good are the stunning backing vocals. I like the superb, basic guitar riff as well.


Anthony B Too High Anthony B is a favourite of mine. Usually a deejay he is singing here. Another song about poverty (not drugs). Prices too high! Crime rate is too high!

Magilla wrote: 6) Again, great vocals over a typically bouncy riff. I like this track.


Natty King No More War. As with the last track on the Flute riddim. Natty King is another deejay who has a number of hits in the last couple of years. Lyrically similar to the last track. Criticizing the remoteness of governments and their failure to address poverty. All of the tracks on the disc (well almost all) are from the last couple of years, in contrast to the other disc I sent you which was largely tracks from early 80’s.

Magilla wrote: 7) Not a bad song, but the synth drums put me off liking it more.


Million Stylez Give Thanks For Life. I doubt there’s a real drum on this whole disc . Million Stylez has been around for 10-15 years I guess and this is the first I’ve heards from him for a while. On the Guardian Angel riddim which was probably the biggest riddim of 2007.

Magilla wrote: 8) A totally excellent, excellent, excellent song. The melody is brilliant and the vocals are very convincing and impressive. I really like the singer here. If he's not regarded as one of reggae's great singers, then I'd like to know why not.


Junior X Love . The only song I’ve heard from him! I just soulseked him and there’s another 5 or 6 songs there. I imagine he’s had a heap of singles but no success to speak of. This song was not a hit. It’s only the second song I’ve put on two mix club discs though!

Magilla wrote: 9) This song also catches what I like about reggae; often the singer is clearly nutty as a fruit cake. The singer's going mental, babbling away about this, that and the next thing. Plus, as a bonus, he has the ability to endlessly echo his own vocals. The words reverberate for ages - he'll sing a line, then draw out the final word for ages. It's pretty intense, but a neat song.


Teflon Let Jah Be Praise. This is a cool track isn’t it. I like his vocal styling too. Another who has had a number of hits in recent years. On the Trumpet riddim as was last track.

Magilla wrote: 10) Big, booming bass, even by reggae standards and fast vocals - good track.


Wayne Marshall Overcome. A mega hit. An oldie for this disc – from 2002. On the diwali riddim which was big internationally as well (it has its own Wikipedia entry). This rhythm meant digitalized handclapping on about ½ the reggae tracks released in the months that followed.

Magilla wrote: 11) The percussion in this is very appealing. The verse singers are quite good, but the main / chorus singer veers too close to rap, which just doesn't work in this context, so that hampers the song from being better.


Bounty Killer & Wayne Marshall Sufferer. Also on the Diwali riddim and also a mega hit.

Magilla wrote: 12) A chunk of heavy toasting (I think). The vocals are good, but the drum machine and synths are a bad touch.


Danny English & Zeno It No Matter. From a few years ago as well. A bit more obvious on the drum machine than most of the tracks I agree.

Magilla wrote: 13) Some more neat toasting. The backing vocals on this are lovely. Good song.


Delly Ranks & Wayne Wonder Lose Control. Wayne Wonder has had some success internationally. It sounds like something else but I can’t place it!

Magilla wrote: 14) Far too smooth, too "reggae-lite" , dangerously near UB40 territory.


T.O.K. I Believe UB40? I happen to like UB40 but I realize this is intended as an insult. TOK are a group of vocalists who have had considerable success over the last 6-7 years. It is a slow down in pace but the vocals are still ‘real’ (as are many of UB40’s!). Sorry you didn’t like it.

Here’s some lyrics:

Walk blindly to the light and reach out for his hand
Don't ask any questions and don't try to understand
Open up your mind and then open up your heart
And you will see that you and me aren't very far apart

'Cause I believe that love is the answer
I believe that love will find the way

Violence is spread worldwide and there are families on the street
And we sell drugs to children now oh why can't we just see
That all we do is eliminate our future with the things we do today
Money is our incentive now so that makes it okay

But I believe that love is the answer
I believe that love will find the way
I believe that love is the answer
I believe that love will find the way

I've been seeing Lisa now for a little over a year
She said she's never been so happy but Lisa lives in fear
That one day daddy's gonna find out she's in love
With a nigger from the streets
Oh how he would lose it then but she's still here with me
'Cause she believes that love will see it through
And one day he'll understand
And he'll see me as a person not just a black man

'Cause I believe that love is the answer
I believe that love will find the way
I believe I believe I believe I believe that love is the answer
I believe that love will find the way

Love will find the way
Love will find the way
Love will find the way
Please love find the way
Please love find the way


Magilla wrote: 15) As with the above, somewhat bland.


Tarrus Riley She’s Royal. This was the biggest song in Jamaica last year. Tarrus is the son of my avatar – Jimmy Riley. A lot of reggae songs are seen as putting down women. This song is about his woman being an African Queen with the qualities of a queen.

Magilla wrote: 16) Too smooth as well. A bit too much modern "r 'n'b" in places as well.


Daville This Time I Promise. There’s a lot of r ‘n’ b in reggae. This is a straight love song.

Magilla wrote: 17) This is heaps better. The harmony singing is wonderful and I really like the staunch rhythms and the clipped guitar line. The lyrics, about smoking the ganja are hilarious: "pass me the Rizla, I have a quarter pound of sizzler" :lol:


Tony Curtis High Grade. Glad we’re back on track. I don’t know if you caught but lyrically this is a play on “Raindrops Keep Falling On my Head”.

High grade is going through my head
And that is why my eyes will soon be turning red


Magilla wrote: 18) Fantastic, very catchy stuff. I'm really impressed with the drumming, loads of neat fills through-out the song. This was a cool song to finish on.


Sanchez Hit Song . A light song to end with. It’s all about making a hit song to be a new number one. Cute lyrics. Sanchez has a lovely voice.

Magilla wrote: Thanks heaps, Peter. I'm still trying to get my head around reggae and both discs you've sent have been great intros to this fascinating, very intriguing genre. Sorry I didn't like 14 - 16, but otherwise this is a neat comp. I especially liked 3, 5, 8, 9, and 13.


Glad you enjoyed it. Let me know if you want to explore anyone further. Here’s the full tracklist:

1. Elephant Man The Bombing 3.46 MARTIAL ARTS RIDDIM
2. Chuck Fender Gash Them & Light Them 4.00 CONFESSIONS RIDDIM
3. Perfect All I’ve Got 3.41 REAL LIFE RIDDIM
4. Capleton Jah Jah City 3.35 LIBERATION RIDDIM
5. Anthony B Too High 3.38 FLUTE RIDDIM
6. Natty King No More War 3.34 FLUTE RIDDIM
7. Million Stylez Give Thanks For Life 3.50 GUARDIAN ANGEL RIDDIM
8. Junior X Love 3.53 TRUMPET RIDDIM
9. Teflon Let Jah Be Praise 3.51 TRUMPET RIDDIM
10. Wayne Marshall Overcome 3.31 DIWALI RIDDIM
11. Bounty Killer & Wayne Marshall Sufferer 3.01 DIWALI RIDDIM
12. Danny English & Zeno It No Matter 3.14 BIGGA JUDGEMENT RIDDIM
13. Delly Ranks & Wayne Wonder Lose Control 3.04 12 GAUGE RIDDIM
14. T.O.K. I Believe 3.49 I BELIEVE RIDDIM
15. Tarrus Riley She’s Royal 4.11 SHE IS ROYAL RIDDIM
16. Daville This Time I Promise 4.14 BAD BELLY RIDDIM
17. Tony Curtis High Grade 3.51 TRIBUTE TO DOWNBEAT PART 2 RIDDIM
18. Sanchez Hit Song 3.59 HIT SONG RIDDIM
One night, an evil spirit held me down
I could not make one single sound
Jah told me, 'Son, use the word'
And now I'm as free as a bird

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Oscar
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Oscar » 25 May 2009, 11:44

Positively George Street
Bonus Disc May '09

A bonus disc that I now know was assemble by Magilla. Well done, chap. I've enjoyed this much more than I would have expected to have enjoyed a collection of shoegazing, slowcore, punk peripheral performances.


1. I thought this was Brian Eno to start with but no... maybe more of a late 70’s new wave punk peripheral band. A real grower.
2. This is such a scorcher. Moody, hypnotic guitars and lethargic dreamy vocals. Reminded me of the Chills. Possibly my joint favourite track on the mix.
3. Jingly jangly indie pop. Very twee, very nice!
4. Excellent! Had this on repeat about 3 times on first listen. Best track on the mix (along with track 2). Very curious about who this is. Quiet, slow paced indie rock/pop track with interesting, slightly strained, precarious male vocalist.
5. This has got a great DIY feel to it. Slightly garagey, punky stoner rock track.
6. Another lo-fi indie pop excursion. Very bright and breezy – vocals remind me a lot of Jarvis Cocker.
7. Slightly darker, guitar layered alt pop/rock. Like this too. Turning out to be a cracking mix.
8. Maintaining the dark mood, this is slightly looser and rockier. It’s got a live feel to it too.
9. Dreamy female vocal on a typically early -80’s new wave retro track. Could be early 90’s shoegaze territory.
10. This is a bit grungier, underground rock. I could see Neil Young and Crazy Horse performing this back in the day
11. This is a live performance. Sounds like a great gig! Reminds me a little of Red crayola. Fucked up, avant gard rock. Brilliant!
12. More structured, anthemic indie rock. Nice dreamy hooks.
13. Thought this was BRMC at first then the female vocals kicked in. Big sonic wall of guitar. I like the lyrics too.
14. Loose, meandering indie guitar mess of a track with druggy vocals. Nice.
15. I like the cacophonous, discordant feel to this. Sounds like a spontaneous jam between the Manics and Dinosaur Jrn
I’ve really enjoyed this and will probably continue to play it until I receive my June Mix. Very curious to know who the artists are and I’m totally gobsmacked that I didn’t recognise a single track. Great stuff!!

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Magilla
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Re: BCB Mix Club - Bonus Discs

Postby Magilla » 26 May 2009, 11:10

Oscar wrote:Positively George Street
Bonus Disc May '09


ImageImage

The title is a reference to both George St, which is one of the main streets here in Dunedin, the book about the '80s Dunedin scene by Matthew Bannister and the comp of his band Sneaky Feelings (more on whom, below).

A bonus disc that I now know was assemble by Magilla. Well done, chap. I've enjoyed this much more than I would have expected to have enjoyed a collection of shoegazing, slowcore, punk peripheral performances.


Thanks, man. :D I knew you liked The Chills' 'Pink Frost' and I wanted to introduce you to some of the other Dunedin bands that were their contemporaries and to give you an idea of just how musically rich the scene was then. Obviously I'm hopelessly biased towards it, but it really was an amazing scene that had a huge impact here in NZ. It also gained an established cult following in America and Europe, but not Britain, despite releases and tours there. I realise you're just calling them "shoe-gazing, slow-core,..." etc just for convenience, but this stuff was mostly before those terms were even thought of.

I'll try to put each band into context for you, as well. The songs are all in an approximate chronological order, too...

1. I thought this was Brian Eno to start with but no... maybe more of a late 70’s new wave punk peripheral band. A real grower.


Toy Love, 'Squeeze' from Cuts 2CD comp of their singles, album, rarities, etc. Recorded in '79, this was the first single by Toy Love, who evolved out of Dunedin punk legends The Enemy. This was their first single and the band would go on to be incredibly inspiring to the nascent Dunedin scene. After splitting in '80, singer Chris Knox and guitarist Alec Bathgate formed the more avant-garde Tall Dwarfs (faves of one Feeb, K), while bassist Paul Kean would go on to be in jangle-pop heroes The Bats.

2. This is such a scorcher. Moody, hypnotic guitars and lethargic dreamy vocals. Reminded me of the Chills. Possibly my joint favourite track on the mix.


The Clean, 'Point That Thing (Somewhere Else)' from the 1981 Boodle, Boodle, Boodle ep, now on Anthology 2CD set. As I've said here often, in terms of status and influence, The Clean are the VU of New Zealand. As with the VU, The Clean could also play lovely medlodic pop songs, but also intense hum-dingers like this.

3. Jingly jangly indie pop. Very twee, very nice!


The Chills, 'Rolling Moon' single, 1982, now on both Kalelidescope World and Heavenly Pop Hits comps. Their debut single and a pointer to the immense potential and talent of this band.

4. Excellent! Had this on repeat about 3 times on first listen. Best track on the mix (along with track 2). Very curious about who this is. Quiet, slow paced indie rock/pop track with interesting, slightly strained, precarious male vocalist.


Sneaky Feelings, 'Husband House' single, 1984, now on Postively George Street comp. The second single by this Dunedin quartet. The singer-guitarist is Matthew Bannister, as mentioned above. This pop band did four or five singles and three albums in the '80s. Incidentally, the other singer-guitarist in this band, David Pine, is now...New Zealand's ambassador to the Phillipines ! :o

5. This has got a great DIY feel to it. Slightly garagey, punky stoner rock track.


The Stones, 'Something New' from Another Disc, Another Dollar ep, 1983, now on the four CD Flying Nun box-set. Yep, The Stones, as opposed to the Rolling Stones, y'see.

6. Another lo-fi indie pop excursion. Very bright and breezy – vocals remind me a lot of Jarvis Cocker.


Verlaines, 'Pyromaniac' from 10 O'Clock In The Afternoon ep, 1984, now on You're Just Too Obscure For Me comp. One of the very greatest Dunedin / Flying Nun bands. The singer-guitarist is Graeme Downes. A year or so after this was recorded, he completed a PhD on Mahler, incidentally.

7. Slightly darker, guitar layered alt pop/rock. Like this too. Turning out to be a cracking mix.


The Great Unwashed, 'Born In The Wrong Time' from 'Singles' double 7" and Singles ep, 1984, now on Collection comp. The GU were a great Dunedin trio; they released two 7" singles in paint-splattered machine-sown-together plastic sleeves; it was soon discovered that the plastic really roughed up the vinyl, so a 12" version using regular cardboard sleeves was quickly released.

8. Maintaining the dark mood, this is slightly looser and rockier. It’s got a live feel to it too.


Doublehappys, 'Nerves' from Cut It Out ep, 1985, now on Nerves comp. The truly great Shayne Carter here on vocals and guitar in his second band. This band's potential was tragically interrupted when Wayne Elsey, the other singer-guitarist, died in a train accident. that year.

9. Dreamy female vocal on a typically early -80’s new wave retro track. Could be early 90’s shoegaze territory.


Look Blue Go Purple, 'Circumspect Penelope' from Bewitched ep, 1985 now on Look Blue Go Purple comp. An all-female Dunedin quintet who did three eps on FN in the '80s. A lovely pop band.

10. This is a bit grungier, underground rock. I could see Neil Young and Crazy Horse performing this back in the day


Alpaca Brothers' 'Hey Man' from Legless ep, 1986, now on FN box-set. A noisy, abrasive, trio live.

11. This is a live performance. Sounds like a great gig! Reminds me a little of Red crayola. Fucked up, avant gard rock. Brilliant!


The Puddle, 'Jealousy' from Pop Lib ep, 1986, now on Over The Moon comp. A very under-rated Dunedin band, who plied frenetic, psych-pop.

12. More structured, anthemic indie rock. Nice dreamy hooks.


Straitjacket Fits, 'She Speeds' from Life In One Chord ep, 1987, now on Straitjacket Fits comp. This four-piece was formed by Shayne Carter after the Doublehappys. 'She Speeds' is as totemic to people of my age / music scene as 'White Man In Hammersmith Palais' or 'Love Will Tear Us Apart' or 'Freak Scene' is to other people and their scene. It timelessly captured and epitomised what the scene was about. Straitjacket Fits did several singles and three albums on FN which didn't even begin to show what an extraordinarily exciting live act they were

13. Thought this was BRMC at first then the female vocals kicked in. Big sonic wall of guitar. I like the lyrics too.


Snapper, 'Buddy' from Snapper ep, 1988, now on FN box-set. Fuck me they were a phenomenal live act. Their first album Shotgun Blossom is superb, while a lesser second line-up recorded the poor ADM.

14. Loose, meandering indie guitar mess of a track with druggy vocals. Nice.


Plagal Grind, 'Timebomb' , recorded in 1988, from Morse / Gaudylight comp of singer-guitarist Alastair Galbraith's early material. They only did one s/t 12" ep on Xpressway, but all four members had superb other bands / recordings.

15. I like the cacophonous, discordant feel to this. Sounds like a spontaneous jam between the Manics and Dinosaur Jrn


3Ds, 'Evil Kid' from Fish Tales ep, 1989. One of my very favourite bands, this four-piece. How much did I love this band ? Well, let's just say I saw them in 11 different venues, let alone how many times I saw them at the Empire or Sammy's. Several singles and eps and three albums on FN. Imagine a cross between Television, Sonic Youth and The Gobetweens with lyrics by Shane McGowan (this lot were keen on boozing).

I’ve really enjoyed this and will probably continue to play it until I receive my June Mix. Very curious to know who the artists are and I’m totally gobsmacked that I didn’t recognise a single track. Great stuff!!


I'm really glad you like it. This scene meant an immense amount to me in my youth and I'm always keen to give people some kind of insight into it. *Cough* as much as you like !
"U2 routinely spent a year in the studio...I have a theory: if you put four monkeys in the studio for a year with Lanois and Eno and Lillywhite, they would make a pretty good record, too."